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To continue reading this article you will need to purchase access to the online archive. Please email digital historytoday. Skip to main content. Google Tag Manager. Edited by George Holmes.

Icons of Europe: The Story of Flower Art

Alexander Murray Published in. Menstruation and the Holocaust. Also covered were issues of church reform and the development of long distance trade. Chapter five was by Peter Denley and focused on the Renaissance Mediterranean. Too much was covered to adequately summarize here, but I found Denley's assertions that the early voyages of exploration by Vasco da Gama and others had deep medieval routes though of course their results produced a profound break with the middle ages and however revolutionary humanist and Renaissance ideas were, their origins particularly two elements, chivalric and religious in nature were firmly rooted in medieval culture.

Chapter six dealt with civilization in northern Europe from to and was by Malcolm Vale. Major themes included the evolution of the ceremonies and symbols of royalty, the rise and fall of various royal dynasties that got a little dry , the evolution of the papacy and monasticism, and a discussion of chivalry and of medieval literature. I found the book interesting and a good overview.

Some parts were more interesting than others but all in all I found it a valuable read. I would have liked more detail on some issues but it was intended to be fairly broad in scope. I'm not going to spend much time reviewing these books This one was ever so slightly dated, but otherwise dense of information.

Illustrated History Of Europe by Frédéric Delouche

The reason why I so enjoyed Chester Starr's history of the Ancient World is that, despite many of the questionable opinions he puts forward, he presents an interpretation of that world that is broad and deep, taking in not only military adventures and seismic demographi I'm not going to spend much time reviewing these books The reason why I so enjoyed Chester Starr's history of the Ancient World is that, despite many of the questionable opinions he puts forward, he presents an interpretation of that world that is broad and deep, taking in not only military adventures and seismic demographic shifts, but the religion, literature, art, and cultural life at length.

One always has the option to disagree with the author and I frequently do , but his vehemence and sense of relevance makes the cultural life of the Minoans and the Etruscans important and engaging. This book , the Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval Europe is perhaps a more traditional venture, in the sense that it is almost entirely preoccupied not only with politics, demography, and commerce, but that from the exclusive perspective of the nobility, despite an abundance of clerical and mercantile records.

This wasn't without exception For a non-historian, however, the text was quite dry, which didn't help the fact that it was a long, long, LONG read approaching pages of tiny text with lots of dates. Whatever the hazards of bias in a history that takes in too much loose territory, I simply cannot get that into a history of the Middle Ages that neglects Chaucer and Dante, Giotto and Pisano, the Beowulf poet and Peter Abelard, the Romanesque and the Gothic Cathedrals.

The freaking Hagia Sophia. These are at least as significant to that time's landscape as the wars between German emperors and the pope, and the book suffered from the omissions. This book was useful, but its limitations were quite apparent. I wish I would have read something either more brief and economical, or more vividly rendered. Originally published on my blog here in November This history, in tone somewhere between a popular and an academic exposition, divides Europe into two zones north and Mediterranean and the medieval period into three sections ,, Each division is covered by a lengthy essay by a different author, making six in all, topped and tailed by short editorial commentaries.

The strength of the editing is indicated by the fact that there is no obvious stylistic change from on Originally published on my blog here in November The strength of the editing is indicated by the fact that there is no obvious stylistic change from one chapter to another; the writing is sufficiently uniform to be the work of a single writer. Rather than following political events, the emphasis is on developments on the social and economic fronts, to show the reader a broad outline of the way in which the ancient world transformed itself into the medieval and thence to the modern.

English language medieval histories tend to concentrate on England and France; this one has more about Italy and Germany, making a refreshing change. The illustrations are interesting and well selected - not just the standard pictures which are reproduced endlessly. It would be nice if a few more of them were in colour. There is a small problem with proof reading - in the genealogical table of the kings of Castile, for example, the date of death of Alfonso XI is given as , while in the text a point is made of its being he was the only major ruler to die in the massive plague epidemic of that year.

Yes, I really liked it. I have come to believe that I cannot achieve a clear understanding of my culture and that of Europe without understanding the period from the collapse of the Roman Empire to, say, the end of the Renaissance or the beginning of the Enlightenment. The dark years from to set the stage for the events of the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries, leading to what Barbara Tuchman called the "disastrous" 14th century. This book takes aim at exactly this period of time; in Yes, I really liked it.

This book takes aim at exactly this period of time; in particular it examines the effects of the Byzantine empire and Muslim culture on Western Europe in those years, a subject that is poorly studied to put it mildly in Southern California. What an incredible time! The Muslims were insular and rarely traveled to or studied Europe; the Europeans through the vehicle of the Crusades exported their soldiers of fortune, the condodittieri, frequently imbued with the insane philosophy of chivalry.

The Renaissance was about the re-discovery of ancient knowledge, among other things. The Muslim world played a key role in preserving this knowledge and provided one of the primary resources for this re-discovery: "the [Spanish] peninsula still provided an important meeting-place for Christian, Muslim, and Jewish culture.


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An influential school of translation emerged in Toledo Its main area of interest was scientific and mathematical works But the distniguished abbot of Cluny, Peter the Venerable On a less elevated level, Peter Alfonsi the converted Jew Moses Sephardi was responsible through his works for the introduction of many oriental tales into the literature of western Europe--both Chaucer and Boccaccio were to draw upon his stories. Many of the musical instruments familiar to mediaval men were also of Moorish origin As a survey, the writing doesn't inspire, but it does inform.

See, for example, Morris Bishop's The Middle Ages for a history with a consistently higher level of writing. Interesting is that Dark Ages weren't so dark, nor were they the result and fault of a repressive Christianity. The common folks of classic civilization lived lives just like the lives of those of the Dark Ages. In fact, with the collapse High-level survey by multiple authors of Middle Ages from the Dark Ages to the Renaissance. In fact, with the collapse of the Roman Empire and the rise and spread of Christianity, there was a flowering of study, history, and literature, much of liturgical or doctrinal, some heretical, some orthodox.

Its was a battle for hearts and minds, waged of course among the smaller upper crust of literacy. Shelves: fun. So far, I love it as if you couldn't tell from the rating. I love how it's divided and all the pictures! So many history books seem to be 'picture-phobic' this, as you would expect from the title, not. I was disappointed first of all that Islam was treated as an afterthought rather than the major driving force in the development of Europe that it was, and also that there wasn't any history of everyday life.

Icons of Europe: The Story of Flower Art

Jun 14, Ryanofthenorth rated it did not like it. Words fail to describe how terrible this book was.

The History of Europe: Every Year

I've read quite a few Historical surveys and, while I understand the limitations of the format, I've never encountered one that was so devoid of coherence as this one. You will learn little about Medieval Europe reading this, as most of the Authors act like Medieval chroniclers rather than historians. Dates and names fill the pages nearly context free, except when they take the time to point out how a superior work Waning of the Middle ages is Words fail to describe how terrible this book was. Dates and names fill the pages nearly context free, except when they take the time to point out how a superior work Waning of the Middle ages is incorrect although their argument is pathetically weak.

About this book

Chapter 4 was tolerable, the rest was a mess. I'm not sure how Oxford thought this was a good idea. This is a very good collection of articles by different authors. They are all brought together skillfully by the editor as the chapters flow seamlessly and lack that awkwardness that so many books that consist of the thoughts of various authors are plagued by.

The consistency and just all around good writing make this easy to read and easy to understand. I recommend it for those interested in Medieval history. I learned a lot of things I didn't know from reading this.

go to site My knowledge of this period of European history has been sorely lacking. I can imagine that the task of engaging with the works of historians past and of accessing, collating, and evaluating archives in various aspects would be an endevour that could occupy an academic for a lifetime. Given that there were 6 contributing authors to this work gives credence to the idea that no one individual is up to the task themselves Good survey of medieval history.

Nov 29, Jeroen Van de Crommenacker rated it it was ok. Too disjointed. Has some interesting parts but no cohesion.